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Toronto Lawyers

Wagner Sidlofsky LLP

Wagner Sidlofsky LLP is a Toronto law firm providing legal counsel to international and Canadian individuals and businesses involved in disputes. The firm’s areas of practice include Estate Litigation, Commercial Litigation and Elder Law.

We only litigate.

As a Toronto law firm, our lawyers’ proficiency has developed from the single minded focus of their practice in their areas of expertise. Every lawyer brings his/her own unique talents to the firm, but each shares a commitment to excellence. We get results by tenaciously and assertively advocating for our clients.

The firm’s lawyers regularly appear in the Ontario Superior Court of Justice and the Ontario Court of Appeal as well as various administrative tribunals.

What We Do

  • Will Challenges
  • Quantum Meruit Claims
  • Dependent Relief Claims
  • Executor Removals
  • Power Of Attorney Issues
  • Statutory Guardianship
  • Solicitors’ Negligence
Estate Litigation
  • Shareholder Disputes
  • Partnership Disputes
  • Real Estate Litigation
  • Construction Litigation
  • Professional Negligence
Commercial Litigation

Who We Are

Learn about each of our lawyers and how we may help you with your legal issues.

Articles and Blogs

Read from our archive of information on
estate and commercial litigation law.

What Happens When a Party Dies During a Lawsuit?
The death of a party during a lawsuit almost inevitably complicates the litigation. In this first in a series of blogs, we set out the procedural steps that must be taken in order to proceed with the lawsuit following the death of a party.
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Understanding and Applying the Rule to collapse a Trust
There is a tension between the two sometimes conflicting goals of protecting testamentary freedom and permitting sui juris beneficiaries to enjoy their property without undue restrictions. Testamentary freedom is a hallmark of the common law in democratic societies that support the rule of law and property rights generally. Accordingly, testators are, for the most part, legally entitled to dispose of assets as he or she wishes.
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Removal of an Executor
Anecdotally, it appears that a rising number of court cases involve beneficiaries or co-trustees trying to remove a “rogue” executor.
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Can a trustee be removed without evidence of bad behaviour?
It is reasonably easy to imagine many of the possible reasons for which a trustee or executor may be removed from their position by the Court. Perhaps he appropriated trust property for his own benefit, delayed in taking the steps necessary to administer the trust or estate, failed to account for trust property, or was otherwise clearly incompetent in the role.
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Does friction between co-executors warrant removal?
The friction between Peter and Michael was long standing and intense. While the reported case does not specifically say so it appears that the arguments over their mother’s investments was just another platform of expression for their mutual animus. While Peter may have been the executor of his grandfather’s estate Michael was his mother’s litigation guardian.
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What is a Will?

A will is a written document that outlines how the deceased wanted his or her assets distributed after death.

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How do I get a copy of someone’s will after they die?

Disinherited family members and disappointed beneficiaries often are denied access to a copy of a Will by the executors.

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When will a Court remove an estate trustee/executor?

Historically, Ontario’s Courts needed to see evidence of misconduct in order to remove trustees.

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What happens when someone is deemed incapable?

There are many variables to consider and each situation will turn on its own facts.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Visit our resource section to find helpful information, including some answers to frequently asked questions.

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