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Toronto Lawyers

Wagner Sidlofsky LLP

Wagner Sidlofsky LLP is a Toronto law firm providing legal counsel to international and Canadian individuals and businesses involved in disputes. The firm’s areas of practice include Estate Litigation, Commercial Litigation and Elder Law.

We only litigate.

As a Toronto law firm, our lawyers’ proficiency has developed from the single minded focus of their practice in their areas of expertise. Every lawyer brings his/her own unique talents to the firm, but each shares a commitment to excellence. We get results by tenaciously and assertively advocating for our clients.

The firm’s lawyers regularly appear in the Ontario Superior Court of Justice and the Ontario Court of Appeal as well as various administrative tribunals.

What We Do

  • Will Challenges
  • Quantum Meruit Claims
  • Dependent Relief Claims
  • Executor Removals
  • Power Of Attorney Issues
  • Statutory Guardianship
  • Solicitors’ Negligence
Estate Litigation
  • Shareholder Disputes
  • Partnership Disputes
  • Real Estate Litigation
  • Construction Litigation
  • Professional Negligence
Commercial Litigation

Articles and Blogs

Read from our archive of information on
estate and commercial litigation law.

Is an Executor Personally Liable for Estate’s Losses in the Stock Market?
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a precedent-setting drop in the stock markets across the globe. Could executors be held liable for the estate’s losses in their stock portfolios? The case of Groome Estate v. Groome, 2016 ONSC 7850 (“Groome”) is a cautionary tale to those estate trustees that make speculative investments on behalf of an estate.
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Layoffs and COVID-19: Isolating the Issues
Given the unprecedented disruption wrought by COVID-19 in Ontario and around the world, both employers and employees may be asking themselves the following questions: 1. what is the difference between a layoff and being dismissed?; 2. does an employer have a statutory or common law right to lay off an employee absent a contractual provision explicitly or implicitly permitting layoffs to take place?; and 3. can an employee claim that a “layoff” is really wrongful dismissal and seek damages?
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The Dilemma of the Missing Beneficiary
The task of an estate trustee is rarely an easy one. Much less so when a beneficiary of the estate was born in 1925, is believed to have lived in the United Kingdom, and whose whereabouts are not forthcoming from any of the deceased’s family members.  On top of this, he is rumoured to have had an affair with his sister-in-law, after which he was threatened by his brother and may have had reason to go into hiding. The above facts are drawn from a real case, Steele v. Smith, which was recently decided in Ontario. Did the estate trustee in this situation have an obligation to attempt to find the elusive beneficiary?  What should he have done if he couldn’t find him? These questions, and other related legal issues, will be discussed in this blog.
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COVID-19, Force Majeure Clauses and Frustration of Contract
This blog is intended to provide a brief overview of force majeure clauses and the equitable principle of frustration of contract and their potential applicability to the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Moore v. Sweet: The Final Word on Unjust Enrichment?
As set out in the blogs of my colleagues, no discussion of the doctrine of unjust enrichment is complete without a thorough discussion of the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision in Moore v. Sweet.
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What is a Will?

A will is a written document that outlines how the deceased wanted his or her assets distributed after death.

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How do I get a copy of someone’s will after they die?

Disinherited family members and disappointed beneficiaries often are denied access to a copy of a Will by the executors.

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When will a Court remove an estate trustee/executor?

Historically, Ontario’s Courts needed to see evidence of misconduct in order to remove trustees.

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What happens when someone is deemed incapable?

There are many variables to consider and each situation will turn on its own facts.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Visit our resource section to find helpful information, including some answers to frequently asked questions.

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