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Do Mistresses Have a Right to Inheritance?

Can you imagine burying a spouse and then being sued for support by his mistress? For those who believe in primacy on marriage and that marriage obligates its partners to fidelity, the idea of rewarding a mistress to a portion of the family’s an inheritance is unjust. Others argue that financial obligations should flow from the intensity and duration of life partner relationships regardless of the partners' marital status. What do the courts think?
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DISINHERITING CHILDREN WHO MARRY OUTSIDE THE FAITH

The Illinois Supreme Court held that the testamentary clause disinherting a potential beneficiary for marrying outside the faith was valid. The test was whether the provision was capable of producing harm that its enforcement would be contrary to the public interest. The Illinois Supreme Court upheld the Will because they placed a premium on the right of individuals to decide what happens to their assets after they die. They disagreed with the lower courts who suggested that the clause in question was a restraint of marriage
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Money Missing? Powers of Attorney, Executors and Adverse Inference

Very often a parent appoints the favourite child to manage the parent’s property (“power of attorney”) or be the executor under the parent’s will. Perhaps the child is honest but has no idea what obligations are involved with being an attorney for property or as an executor and fails to keep proper records. Perhaps that child is very dishonest and the lack of records is simply his way to hide the improper use of his parent’s money. So what typically happens?
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Objections to Accounts

So if you suspect that the power of attorney has done something wrong what are some of the things you should look for? The first thing you should know is that a power of attorney has both a common law and statutory duty to keep proper records of all transactions involving the property.
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Death Can Cheat a Creditor

A creditor may enforce a judgment for the payment or recovery of money by garnishment. Garnishment is a procedure whereby moneys owing to the debtor (garnishee) by a third person attach directly to the creditor (garnishor). Garnishment attaches to moneys held in a RRSP. In life, there is little question that RRSP’s vest in the owner of the RRSP. At death, section 2(1) of the Estates Administration Act states that any real and personal property of a person that vests in that person during life, is transferred to the personal representative of that person at death, regardless of whether the property is disposed of by will or any other testamentary disposition.
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May An Executor Buy Estate Assets?

Executors often want to buy assets belonging to an estate. Beneficiaries often suspect the executors of wrong doing. So I often am asked whether it’s legal for an executor to buy an asset from the estate. The short answer is maybe, possibly, but not usually. it would be prudent to for all the beneficiaries to obtain independent legal advice. Furthermore, the purchase price should be somewhat more then fair market value. With all these arrows in his/her quiver the trustee might be well advised to seek preapproval of the sale from the court by bringing an application for the opinion, advice and direction of the court under Rule 14.05(3)(d), and under section 60 of the Trustee Act, R.S.O. 1990, c. T.23.
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Stopping Probate

Probate in Ontario is called "a certificate of appointment of estate trustee with a will". This article addresses what steps have to be taken in Ontario to stop the process of getting a Will probated.
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Seduction, Marriage and Elder Abuse

In this case, the children were fortunate that the judge found that the father’s residence was really held in trust for the children so it did not form part of the estate. Muna did not get much money. This time the children were lucky. Unfortunately, that is not always the case.
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Elder Abuse in Ontario

The Ontario Network for the Prevention of Elder abuse estimates that there may be as many as 150,000 victims of Elder Abuse in Ontario. Elder Abuse can take many forms. One common form of Elderly abuse is financial. The purpose behind this blog is to provide some information to people on the first steps they might consider when discovering the problem
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First Step in Will Challenge in Ontario

The first step to challenging a Will in Ontario depends on whether probate been granted? Any person can go to the local court registrar and do a search to see if the court has granted a certificate of appointment which established the validity of the Will (Probate). If probate has not been granted then the person objecting to the will can file a form called “a Notice of Objection” with the court registrar. If probate has been granted then the person objecting to the will has to bring a motion for the return of the certificate of appointment.
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